Casino & games

ESIC nears conclusion of extensive MDL match-fixing probe

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The Esports Integrity Commission (ESIC) has said that it is nearing the end of a wide-ranging probe into alleged match-fixing within the Mountain Dew League (MDL) esports competition, saying it has carried out 15 investigations into the matter.

The Esports Integrity Commission (ESIC) has said that it is nearing the end of a wide-ranging probe into alleged match-fixing within the Mountain Dew League (MDL) esports competition, saying it has carried out 15 investigations into the matter.

A joint venture between esports organiser ESL and soft drinks brand Mountain Dew, the MDL is a Counter-Strike: Global Offensive (CS:GO) tournament, giving amateur players the opportunity to launch themselves on the circuit.

However, over the past 18 months, the ESIC said it received suspicious bet alerts through its global integrity monitoring framework, prompted to launch an investigation into the issue.

Providing an update, the ESIC said it has conducted “extensive investigations” into the allegations against several parties, liaising with relevant anti-corruption supporters in order to gather evidence and analyse the claims.

The ESIC said it used a number of investigative tools and contacts to link the bettors who placed the suspicious and unusual wagers to the MDL players and teams potentially involved in the matter.

With some 15 investigations now reaching their conclusion, the ESIC said it will publish a formal statement on its findings within the next four weeks.

“Investigations into match-fixing are complex and require significant cooperation between a variety of international stakeholders comprising of betting operators, government bodies, law enforcement agencies, and industry stakeholders,” the ESIC said.

“Furthermore, as determinations in this category can often coincide with the prospect of criminal liability, ESIC takes additional steps to ensure that careful skill and attention has been given to all aspects of the investigative process.”

The update comes after three Counter Strike: Global Offensive (CS:GO) team coaches were this week issued with professional bans for cheating after they were found to have exploited an in-game bug to gain an advantage in matches.

ESL and fellow esports tournament organisers DreamHack announced the bans following an investigation by the ESIC.

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