KSA begins preparation for self-exclusion roll-out

| By Daniel O'Boyle
Dutch gambling regulator De Kansspelautoriteit (KSA) has provided the technical details for its self-exclusion scheme, the Centraal Register Uitsluiting Kansspelen (Cruks), so that land-based operators may work on integrating the solution before it becomes mandatory for all licensees.

Dutch gambling regulator De Kansspelautoriteit (KSA) has provided the technical details for its self-exclusion scheme, the Centraal Register Uitsluiting Kansspelen (Cruks), so that land-based operators may work on integrating the solution before it becomes mandatory for all licensees.

A test version of Cruks will be available on 13 July for land-based operators to make sure their connection to the system is working properly. The KSA encouraged land-based operators to obtain a Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) certificate as soon as possible for authentication purposes so they can begin to implement the scheme.

When a player arrives at a land-based casino, the operator will have to check if the player is registered with Cruks before granting entry. Players are identified through a unique Cruks Code made up of their Citizen Service Number (BSN), name, date of birth and gender.

The KSA will also hold an information session on 25 June to answer any questions about the scheme.

Players may register for Cruks themselves, or an operator or family member may do so on their behalf.

Online gambling will also be required to integrate Cruks under the new Remote Gambling Act. However, as the act will not come into effect until January 2021, with the market only opening in July 2021, testing sessions for online operators were not offered at this point.

Yesterday (22 June), the KSA launched a tender process seeking to appoint a provider to operate a new national problem gambling service.

Last week (18 June), the Netherlands’ Minister for Legal Protection Sander Dekker looked to better clarify how he expects operators to avoid excessive advertising, in the latest round of parliamentary questions in the country’s igaming legislation.

He said operators must ensure promotions were fair by providing information about the specific characteristics of the products advertised and flagging the risks caused by excessive gambling.

Dekker added that ads must also avoid creating unrealistic expectations, by suggesting that a player has already won, or has an enhanced chance of winning. Content that downplays the risks of excessive play is also prohibited, and licence holders are banned from directing advertising at vulnerable groups, such as minors or those that show signs of developing gambling addictions.

Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter

Digitain