Georgia suffers online gaming blow, Michigan introduces bill

| By contenteditor
Georgia’s hopes of legalising online gambling have been dealt a major blow after a meeting to discuss the matter was cancelled, while Michigan has put forward a new bill.

Georgia’s hopes of legalising online gambling have been dealt a major blow after a meeting to discuss the matter was cancelled, while Michigan has put forward a new bill.

The US state’s House Regulated Industries Committee had been due to meet on Friday, just five days after the Senate sponsor of the legislation said the bill was dead for the current year.

However, Representative Calvin Smyre confirmed that the meeting had been cancelled and the bill would miss out on the 2017 Georgia General Assembly session.

The bill is likely to be reintroduced next year as supporters of online gaming continue their push for legalisation in the state.

Meanwhile, Michigan has become the latest US state to introduce a bill in the hope of legalising internet gambling.

‘The Lawful Internet Gaming Act’ would regulate various forms of online gaming, including internet poker.

Michigan State Senator Mike Kowall, who is on the Senate Committee, is backing the bill as a sponsor, while five other committee members have been declared as co-sponsors.

Measures in the proposed legislation include a restriction that only land-based casinos in Michigan can apply for an online gaming licence, although the state would not cap the number of licences it issues.

A five-year operator licence would cost $200,000 (€188,700) in the first year and then $100,000 in the subsequent years.

Platform licences would be priced at $100,000 for year one and $50,000 in the following years, while vendor licences would cost $5,000 and then $2,000 in the subsequent years,

Related article: Three states join push for expanded sports betting in US

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