Lithuania and Ukraine gambling regulators sign MoU

| By Robert Fletcher
Lithuania’s Gambling Supervisory Authority has signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with Ukraine’s Commission on the Regulation of Gambling and Lotteries to work together on gambling and lottery supervision.

Under the agreement, the two regulatory bodies will exchange information, share details of good practice and trade ideas on how to improve gambling, deepen their knowledge of the industry and ensure the implementation of relevant laws in each country.

Industry experts from each organisation will also collaborate to exchange legal information, market regulation practices, topical issues surrounding the application of legal acts and the requirements for businesses.

In addition, the two regulators will hold joint seminars, lectures and other practice exchange events for specialist staff from each organisation. 

“We are ready to share with our Ukrainian colleagues our experience in areas where we already have considerable expertise and practice, such as in the field of problem gambling prevention, application of measures against entities providing illegal remote gambling services, and technical requirements for gambling devices,” Lithuania’s Gambling Supervision Service director Virginijus Daukšys said.

“We are very happy with this agreement and the fact that our new partners are colleagues of this persistent, unyielding and proud state institution. We hope that this cooperation will be mutually beneficial, and we will, as much as we can, help our Ukrainian colleagues in their needs according to our competence.”

The MoU comes after Ukraine’s Commission on the Regulation of Gambling and Lotteries this week issued a reminder to gambling venues in the country to ensure they are operating in line with wartime curfew measures.

Some gambling establishments have begun to reopen across Ukraine despite the ongoing invasion by Russia, with some operators having relocated to western regions away from the main areas of conflict in the east of the country.

While such venues are allowed to open, they are required to operate in line with temporary measures that have been put in place as a result of the country moving to martial law during wartime.

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